A Mist Went Up

This is the history of the heavens and the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, before any plant of the field was in the earth and before any herb of the field had grown. For the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the earth, and there was no man to till the ground; but a mist went up from the earth and watered the whole face of the ground.

(Genesis 2:4-6) NKJV

Contextually the mist that went up was a phenomenon which happened during the week of creation, specifically on the third day. However, in conservative Christian doctrine this condition persisted until the time of Noah.

The hydrological cycle of the original Earth was driven by geothermal heating of the great deep. This caused the water to expand which forced it out of the opening at Rosh (Eden) which fed four rivers. No mist was necessary once the cycle was established, which was any time after the end of the third day.

We’ve heard it said by preachers that the people of Noah’s time had never seen rain until the fateful day when the deluge began. This interpretation isn’t necessary either. There are a couple of reasons why.

Context

When He established the clouds above, When He strengthened the fountains of the deep, When He assigned to the sea its limit, So that the waters would not transgress His command, When He marked out the foundations of the earth,

(Proverbs 8:28-29) KJV

If clouds were established at the same time that the fountains of the great deep were strengthened or sealed shut, which was on the third day, then the clouds on the third day were the mist that went up. Those are the facts. That doesn’t have any bearing on the other 1,656 years which passed before Noah’s flood. There is no information about the conditions after the third day.

Couplets and Logic

before any plant of the field was in the earth and before any herb of the field had grown. For the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the earth, and there was no man to till the ground;

(Genesis 2:5) NKJV

Hebrew is frequently written in couplets which balance themselves like either side of the [=] in an equation.

A1 , A2 : B1 , B2

Genesis 2:5 is a couplet. In context the dry ground was covered with vegetation on the third day, when the land was stretched out over the waters. This was when the fountains of the great deep would have been necessary. The fountains allowed the passage of the deep into the interior of the Earth and then they were sealed shut with magma, causing a mist to rise up. That’s one side of the couplet. The other side is that there was no rain and no man. If there was no man then this has to be referring to any time before the sixth day when Adam was created.

AB
1before any plant of the field was in the earthFor the Lord God had not caused it to rain on the earth
2and before any herb of the field had grownand there was no man to till the ground
– Genesis 2:5 as a couplet.

This helps us understand the couplet in Genesis 2:5. However it’s time-sensitive and context-dependent.

The Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there He put the man whom He had formed.

(Genesis 2:8) KJV

Now, on the sixth day, there’s a man. This means that there may also be rain. The concepts are linked, that’s what couplet’s do. The idea that there was no rain until the time of Noah isn’t supported. It’s an example of Pastoral fudge.


March 8th – What sealed the fountains of the great deep?

Hydrology Deduction 6: Something sealed shut the fountains of the great deep at the end of the third day.


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